Radon gas facts about radon

Home

Sinus Infection

Vitamins

Exercise

Depression


Oxygen Cancer
MRSA Fact Sheet
PRP Therapy
Breakfast
Energy Field
Carbohydrates
Tendonitis
Basic Health
Blood Pressure
Sports Nutrition
Osteoporosis
Insomnia
Sports  Injuries

Weight Loss Help

Hoodia
Energy First
Diet Zone

Meditation
Reduce Stress
Immune system
Yoga
Starting Out
Vitamins
Blood Pressure
Reduce Stress
Omega3

Home Gyms
Fitness Books
Yoga Direct
10 Exercise Tips
HGH
TransFat
Basic Workout
Fitness Mistakes

Bad Food

Sleep


Shin Splints
Motivation
Ginger Root
Fat Cells
Six Pack Abs
Diet Mistakes

Ice Cream Facts
Vegan Foods
Pilates
Green Tea
Hydrapak
Stretching


 

 

 Radon gas is the second leading cause of lung cancer.  There are many homes in the U.S. has a high level of indoor radon The U.S. Surgeon General and EPA recommend all homes be tested for radon. Homes with high radon levels can be fixed.

 The Surgeon General of the United States has issued a Health Advisory warning Americans about the health risk from exposure to radon in indoor air. 

 The Nationís Chief Physician urged Americans to test their homes to find out how much radon they might be breathing.  Dr. Carmona also stressed the need to remedy the problem as soon as possible when the radon level is 4 pCi/L or more.

 According to a recent Mayo Clinic study on weight loss, participants who received cash incentives were more likely to stick with the weight-loss program and lost more weight than participants who received no incentives. Find your incentive when you bet on your weight loss with a HealthyWager from HealthyWage.

 


  Dr. Carmona noted that more than 20,000 Americans die of radon-related lung cancer each year. EPA is issuing an annual reminder for Americans to test for radon gas in their homes. Jeff Holmstead, assistant administrator for the Office of Air and Radiation, has signed a proclamation declaring January as National Radon gas Action Month. Radon is a chemical element with the atomic number 86, and is represented by the symbol Rn. It is a radioactive, colorless, odorless, tasteless noble gas.

 Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States with about 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year related to radon exposure. A radioactive, invisible, odorless gas that comes from the decay of naturally occurring uranium in the earth's soil, radon can accumulate in homes at dangerous levels. Because families spend more time indoors during the winter months, January is an opportune time to test for radon. Simple, inexpensive do-it-yourself radon gas test kits are available at local hardware stores. EPA recommends that houses with radon levels of four picocuries or higher of radon gas should and can be fixed to prevent accumulation of radon gas indoors. To learn more about how to receive a discounted radon home test kit, for more information about radon and to contact your state radon office.

 U.S. Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona warned the American public about the risks of breathing indoor radon by issuing a national health advisory today. The advisory is meant to urge Americans to prevent this silent radioactive gas from seeping into their homes and building up to dangerous levels. Dr. Carmona issued the advisory during a two-day Surgeon General's Workshop on Healthy Indoor Environment. "Indoor radon gas is the second-leading cause of lung cancer in the United States and breathing it over prolonged periods can present a significant health risk to families all over the county," Dr. Carmona said. "It's important to know that this threat is completely preventable. Radon can be detected with a simple test and fixed through well-established venting techniques."

 Radon gas is an invisible, odorless and tasteless gas, with no immediate health symptoms, that comes from the breakdown of uranium inside the earth. Simple test kits can reveal the amount of radon in any building. Those with high levels can be fixed with simple and affordable venting techniques. According to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates, one in every 15 homes nationwide have a high radon level at or above the recommended radon action level of 4 picoCuries (pCi/L) per liter of air. Americans need to know about the risks of indoor radon and have the information and tools they need to take action. That's why EPA is actively promoting the Surgeon General's advice urging all Americans to get their homes tested for radon. If families do find elevated levels in their homes, they can take inexpensive steps that will reduce exposure to this risk," said Jeffrey R. Holmstead, Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation
 
 
 The problem is also adversely affecting our children's health as millions of homes and apartments and one in five schools in America have indoor air quality problems. This can trigger various allergies and asthma. Asthma alone accounts for 14 million missed school days each year. The rate of asthma in young children has risen by 160 percent in the past 15 years, and today one out of every 13 school-age children has asthma. Dr. Carmona is especially focusing on how unhealthy indoor environment affects children, as he promotes 2005 as The Year of the Healthy Child.

    Radon gas information and products
 



Jumping Rope Teeth Dental Muscle Performance Bodybuilding Sports Training
Reduce BP Naturally Elliptical Trainer Fitness components Wrestling Training Vitamin B
CFS Vitamin D Strength Training Minerals Resistance Training

Nordic Walking Fish Oil Abs Machines Fitness Success Abs Work Out
Weight Loss Muscle Injury Rotator Cuff Pull Action Plan MRSA
Candida Allergy Symptoms Heart Acid Reflux Cholesterol Aerobic
Concussion Diarrhea HCL Constipation Dehydration Dandruff
First Aid Wounds Wellness Immune Boost Whiplash Pain

Lose Stomach Fat Chest Workouts Ski Training Arthritis Pain Pole Vault Training
Nutrition Muscle Cramps Overtraining Heart Healthy Whey Protein
Building Mass Protein Intake Plyometric Training Steroid Use Soccer Guide

Turf Toe

Knee

Knee Pain

Stress

Acid Reflux

Gaining Weight Kidney Stones Acid Reflux Equipment Obesity