Emergency Action Plan Physical Examination EMS

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 You need to get your Preparticipation Physical Examination for sports
 A preparticipation physical examination (PPE) is done before a sports season in most if not all middle schools, high schools, and colleges.  The main reason for a PPE is for the safety of the athlete.
 
 A PPE is basically a health/medical history of the athlete and their family.  A PPE asks very general to complex questions.  It starts out with basic information such as name, address, contact information, and emergency contacts.     
 Basic vital signs are also documented, blood pressure, pulse, height, weight, vision.  Immunization records are also needed.  Generally, family physician and insurance information is asked for as well.

 


 
  An extensive history if key to finding any risks and problems that may affect the athlete.  Cardiovascular questions are asked, such as any chest pain experiences and or shortness of breath.  Questions are also asked about dizziness, back and neck pain, headaches, lightheadedness, confusion, syncope, passing out , menstrual cycle (females), and injury or surgery history, and physiological issues such as weight .  Any current medications taken by the athlete need to be written down as well.
 
 A complete orthopedic exam must be completed as well.  This tests range of motion in the joints, abnormal bony problems such as scoliosis, winging scapula , joint dysfunctions hypermobility or restrictions , and but not limited to pain with any movements.  During this section myotomes are also tested.
 
 The athletic trainer can do all the above listed parts of the PPE.  The doctor does the medical section where head, eyes, ears, nose, throat, heart and lungs, and abdomen are checked.  They listen for heart sounds, murmurs, dysrhythmia irregular heart beat .  The doctor also checks over the entire PPE and signs the document and the athlete is cleared to play, cleared with recommends for further care, or not cleared.

 For large groups, it is easiest and most efficient to have different stations for each section of the exam.  Place stations around the gym, with a separate room available if something personal needs to be examined further.  Preparticipation Physical Examination can be done individually, however, it takes a lot longer, and if you have a larger number this can be really timely.

 
   How to create an Emergency Action Plan  EAP
 
  An emergency action plan should be implemented at all athletic events, as well as in office buildings.  An emergency action plan is a well-developed, organized plan of what will happen in the event of certain emergencies.  Emergency action plans can vary in size and information.  Hang on by each phone that lists the name, address, and phone numbers of the specific location. 

 Local numbers to the police, fire, hospitals, and poison control should be included.  Add 911 to the list.  Numbers to fellow athletic trainers, team physicians, and other medical personnel can be listed as well.  Put the numbers in order of chain of command.  In emergent situations it is best to lay everything out clearly since things can get hectic. 
 
 The full emergency action plan should include the above listed information plus much more.  For athletic facilities, information about all available equipment should be listed as well as their locations throughout the venue.  Include venue maps and locations in your plan.  This will make is simple for you to see where EMS can enter the site and the best evacuation routes if needed.  If combination locks are used at certain gates include the codes, as well as any other codes needed to get through doors. 
 
 Other items to include in your plan are potential health hazards dealing with the environment.  Put in a lightning safety plan, information about heat illness and cold illness.  Specific temperatures should be listed, even put in charts about the humidity and wind chill.  This way you can easily see if it is safe to practice and/or play outside. 
 
 Print everything out on paper, plus keep a copy on the computer.  The hard copies should be kept in each venue for easy access.  Use a hard three ring binder and organize it with page separators and put a table of contents.  Organization is the key to a successful plan. Practice the emergency action plan.  Without practice, things will happen that could have been fixed beforehand.  If you run through the plan you will see the simple things that need changed to make it more efficient.  Practice it on a regular basis and make sure everybody involved knows the plan.

   How to prevent a misdiagnosis for your health
 
 Many individuals go to a doctor and get the wrong diagnosis.  Here are some tips on how to prevent a misdiagnosis. 
First and foremost, do not ignore symptoms.  By doing this you could be ignoring something that is preventable.  Something else to do is to avoid self-diagnosis.  You have to have a health care professional do the diagnosing.  Different diseases can mimic each other so you must see a doctor.  A migraine and a stroke have similar symptoms, so it is important to talk to a doctor. 
 
 If one doctor tell you a diagnosis, and it is something serious.  Get a second opinion.  Talk to more than one doctor.  This way you are ensured to have the correct diagnosis and to get the best treatment plan.  Try a proven alternative therapy.  Be sure that is it proven!  This way it is not harmful and not expensive.  Before sure to look at the data and talk to someone about it.  Use the internet to research but do not use it to search for illnesses.
 
 See a specialist if needed.  Many doctors train for certain areas.  Sometimes you need a team of doctors to diagnose and figure out the best treatment plan for difficult diagnoses.  Getting tested, any lab work will help diagnose and find a more specific answer.  Most importantly, be the C.E.O. of your health.  Keep a card with information on it with you in case you cannot speak for yourself.  There are places online where you can find personal medical I.D. cards.

   Emergency Action Plan Physical Examination EMS

 You need to get your Preparticipation Physical Examination for sports  
A preparticipation physical examination (PPE) is done before a sports season in most if not all middle schools, high schools, and colleges.  The main reason for a PPE is for the safety of the athlete.   A PPE is basically a health/medical history of the athlete and their family.  A PPE asks very general to complex questions.  It starts out with basic information such as name, address, contact information, and emergency contacts.  Basic vital signs are also documented, blood pressure, pulse, height, weight, vision.  Immunization records are also needed.  Generally, family physician and insurance information is asked for as well.
 
 An extensive history if key to finding any risks and problems that may affect the athlete.  Cardiovascular questions are asked, such as any chest pain experiences and or shortness of breath.  Questions are also asked about dizziness, back and neck pain, headaches, lightheadedness, confusion, syncope,passing out , menstrual cycle (females), and injury or surgery history, and physiological issues such as weight .  Any current medications taken by the athlete need to be written down as well.
 
 A complete orthopedic exam must be completed as well.  This tests range of motion in the joints, abnormal bony problems such as scoliosis, winging scapula , joint dysfunctions hypermobility or restrictions , and but not limited to pain with any movements.  During this section myotomes are also tested.
 
 The athletic trainer can do all the above listed parts of the PPE.  The doctor does the medical section where head, eyes, ears, nose, throat, heart and lungs, and abdomen are checked.  They listen for heart sounds, murmurs, dysrhythmia irregular heart beat .  The doctor also checks over the entire PPE and signs the document and the athlete is cleared to play, cleared with recommends for further care, or not cleared.
 
 For large groups, it is easiest and most efficient to have different stations for each section of the exam.  Place stations around the gym, with a separate room available if something personal needs to be examined further.  Preparticipation Physical Examination can be done individually, however, it takes a lot longer, and if you have a larger number this can be really timely.

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